Indy Animal Care Services moves to emergency intake status as it runs out of space – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather

INDIANAPOLIS – Indianapolis Animal Care Services said Wednesday it is moving to emergency intake status due to staffing shortages and a lack of kennel space. “This temporary adjustment to our operations is necessary for us to continue to care for the hundreds of animals already in our care,” said IACS Deputy […]

INDIANAPOLIS – Indianapolis Animal Care Services said Wednesday it is moving to emergency intake status due to staffing shortages and a lack of kennel space.

“This temporary adjustment to our operations is necessary for us to continue to care for the hundreds of animals already in our care,” said IACS Deputy Director Katie Trennepohl. “During this time, the shelter will only accept animals in emergency situations and all surrendered animals will be at high risk for euthanasia.”

Residents who feel they may qualify for an emergency surrender can email [email protected]

Trennepohl says Animal Control Officers will still be responding to calls, but they will only bring animals to IACS in emergency situations.

Anyone who finds a lost pet is asked to try and locate the owners before taking it to the shelter. Found pets should be posted on Indy Lost Pet Alert and shared on social media sites such as Facebook and Nextdoor. Whenever possible, pets should be taken to a veterinarian to be scanned for a microchip. If you are not able to hold on to a found pet, IACS asks that you not pick it up.

If you are thinking about giving up your pet, Indy Animal Care Services asks that you use the resources on the shelter’s website to find a new home for your four-legged friend. Rehoming your pet keeps it from entering the stressful shelter environment and keeps kennel space open for pets who need it the most.

IACS works with Rehome by Adopt-a-pet.com to promote animals available for adoption that are not in the shelter. Visit this link to create a quick and easy profile and share your pet’s story with potential adopters.

If you need help caring for your pet, such as food or behavior training, the shelter provides help through the Indy CARES program or by emailing [email protected]

The shelter is asking anyone who is thinking about bringing a pet into their home to consider adopting now.

Adoptions are free and no appointment is needed. The shelter is open for adoptions 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. every day. To see adoptable cats and dogs, click here.

If you are unable to adopt, there are others ways you can help IACS.

  • Foster an IACS animal. Foster families are always needed. Being a foster helps get animals out of the stressful shelter environment, while allowing staff to see how they interact in a home. This information can help find the perfect home for the animals. IACS provides all of the necessary supplies for fostering. Visit the foster page to learn more or to apply.
  • Share the IACS story. Sharing the shelter’s social media posts helps spread the word about adoptable animals.
  • Sign up to volunteer. IACS is always looking for volunteers. To learn more about the volunteer program, or to apply, click here. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old.
  • Make a donation. The shelter is supported financially by its nonprofit partner, the Friends of Indianapolis Animal Care Services foundation. Donations help numerous programs throughout the shelter, including Indy CARES. Click here to donate to the Friends of Indianapolis Animal Care Services. Supporters can also visit the IACS Amazon Wish List to have supplies shipped directly to the shelter.

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